Pray the Hurt Away

Most of us learn and grow from painful experiences.

Our deepest and darkest hurts become our life stories. We build these narratives and share them in the hope that others will be strengthened and encouraged. We dig deep, exposing our vulnerabilities to restore hope to the broken.

Yet given the topsy-turvy nature of life, I find myself wondering if I have the grit to share the life stories birthed from tragic or traumatic events.

Call me a wuss, but there are just some lessons I’d rather not learn firsthand. I’m happy to share about joyful inspiring experiences, but the deep, dark, soul-wrenching hurts … not so much.

Why? 

Because when tragedy befalls, your world turns topsy-turvy. Suddenly, nothing makes sense any more. You become hungry for answers. You try to find meaning, to restore balance. You devour people’s shared narratives. You become extremely grateful for everyone who has stood before you and bravely shared their stories, because these become your lifeline:

If she could get through this, so can I;
If he conquered that, so will I

So what to do? 

Pray.

Pray hard for your loved ones. Pray without ceasing.

Why?

There are elements of life known only to God; facets of life that we have little control over, except through prayer.

I love my family fiercely. I pray for their well-being and safety constantly. I pray for their preservation. That evil will keep its nasty claws far far away. I pray that only goodness and mercy will follow them. I pray for my friends, colleagues, church, and community, that God’s love and goodness will prevail.

This is my prayer for you too, dear reader. May the God of love preserve you and keep you from falling. May he cause his face to shine upon you every day of your life.

To quote an oldie, but a goodie:

We got to pray just to make it today, that’s word, we pray (MC Hammer)

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6 thoughts on “Pray the Hurt Away

  1. Thank you for reminding me today of M.C. Hammers “Pray.” When Christian friends recoil when they learn that I find some rap and hip-hop refreshing, this song is where I begin to teach them that a lyric’s genre does not determine its usefulness as a vehicle for bringing good news. Thank you for encouraging and for praying. It’s what we have to do just to make it today.

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    • Hi Michael. Thanks for your great comment. I’m from the school of thought that our environment and experiences are great teachers. I don’t think as Christians we should live in silos isolated from the world. Like you, I listen to more than just gospel. I’d miss out on way too much good music otherwise. Bless!

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    • Yup, we need God’s covering. I’m thankful for my mother’s faithful prayers that have kept us all alive when we were lost and wandering. So just trying to return the favor.

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  2. A beautiful post. We can all relate to pain, and, yes, wonder why we have to experience it. Your advice is good… Though sometimes, I’ll be honest, I really wish God would flash lightning from the sky and really visibly answer my prayers! Sometimes the waiting and wishing and hoping and praying is so hard…

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    • I hear you. I wish for that too sometimes. But I think it’s also true that God provides answers in the people around us as well. I think when you pray in faith, the answers do come, albeit not always according to our schedule. In the meantime, we keep striving and reminding him. I no longer stress about “the answer,” I find that when we walk in obedience, God just sets things in place.

      Why do we have to experience pain? Unfortunately, it seems to be one of the best teachers. Not that I wish pain upon myself, lol, but I find that through hardship, there’s a depth of understanding of God’s grace and your own potential that you wouldn’t know of otherwise. And when we discipline ourselves to embrace the pain, we can endure through it better…hope I didn’t ramble on too much. I’m a new student of pain, so just learning the ropes for now.

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